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Reviews - GoodReads.com

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This is a group for library patrons and staff to review books they've read and share what they are currently reading.


Non-Fiction Reviews: (View All)

  • Mao and Me
  • Author: Chen Jiang Hong
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: Teton Co Call No: J 951.056 Chen J
    Julia's rating: 4 stars

    I've long been intrigued with the cover of this book and its placement in the library. A book about growing up in China under Mao - for children? I wondered.

    Finally, I sat down to read this curious picture book. And, I am so pleased that I did because this thoughtful, informative and sometimes sad book serves as yet another reminder that children's literature is simply not just for kids. And, that picture books may not always be aimed at the youngest of children.

    The story, written and illustrated by Chen Jiang Hong, is a memoir about the author's life growing up before, during and after Mao's Cultural Revolution. It's a beautiful story about traditions, family and survival, while also a bracing reminder about sacrifice, survival and mortality. The illustrations are magnificent, too.

    I would recommend this book for high school students - and anyone older - interested in learning about modern Chinese history. It's a brief look but one with depth and scope.
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  • Great Big Book of Children's Games
  • Author: Debra Wise
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: J 796 Wise D.

    Kay's rating: 3.5 stars

    This is a good resource for parents, grandparents and early childhood & elementary teachers. The games included in this book will get children moving and will take them outdoors; perfect for summer time fun.
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Fiction Reviews:(View All)

  • Powerless (Supers of Noble's Green, #1)
  • Author: Matthew Cody
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TCL Call#: J Cody M

    Chris’s Rating: 4 Stars
    Daniel family moves to Noble’s Green to take care of his ailing grandmother. What awaits Daniel is nothing he could have expected. Being a logical Sherlockonian, he has a hard time accepting that the kids of Noble Green all seem to have superpowers…even with all of the evidence before him. But along with these powers come a set of strict rules, including the rule that powers end at age thirteen. On their thirteenth birthday those with powers completely forget about them…some even forget they knew their past friends. With 13th birthdays coming up, Mollie plans to solve the mystery and defy this rule. But she will need Daniel’s help, for any super trying to “save” their friends also loses their powers, no matter their age.
    Powerless was a very enjoyable light-read that kept me up late into the night. The fact that the main character is powerless adds all the more flare for me as he seeks to save his powerful friends. The story takes some of the stuff you will find in just about any superhero book and adds a few pieces of its own that make it unique. It is not terribly complex, and while the characters have character, they are not deeply developed. I still have unanswered questions about HOW the kids get their powers (especially since if it was hereditary they would be getting them from powerless adults) and there are potential unanswered questions relating to “what ifs,” like “what if one of the families moved away…would other places see a spread in superhero activity?” But for what it’s worth, the read was exciting and I will probably read further into the series at some point. A great book for 9-12 year old boys.
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  • 100 Cupboards (100 Cupboards, #1)
  • Author: N.D. Wilson
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TLC Call #: J CD BOOK WILSON

    Chris’s Review: 4 Stars
    12 year-old Henry goes to visit his relatives in the country when his parents are kidnapped in South America. Now in the middle of nowhere Henry wants to learn to play baseball, but fears he may not be any good. All plans for a “normal” life in the country are shattered when Henry discovers there are dozens of “cupboards” in his attic bedroom…portals to different dimensions just waiting to be explored…except for the black door which Henrietta (one of Henry’s cousins) is infatuated with. Henry has a terrible feeling about that one…and he may just be right.
    For the most part 100 cupboards is a delightful read/listen, starting slow but humorous and picking up speed later on to become a great adventure. Uncle Frank is rather random and funny, Henrietta is often annoying, but makes things happen, and the youngest cousin blabs whatever is on her mind, very unlike her well mannered oldest sister. I didn’t get the sense that Henry has a very strong emotional attachment to his parents (perhaps because they weren’t in his life that much). The ending was rather unexpected and a great hook for a sequel. Great for young readers 9-12 who like humor and travel to make-believe lands.
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