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Teton County Library Mountain Story Festival

May 13 - May 17, 2014

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Celebrate the passions and pursuits of Jackson Hole readers, showcasing stories and storytellers inspired by alpine landscapes and culture. image

Events are free and non-ticketed. Doors open thirty minutes prior to each event with seating available first-come, first-serve. Author talks followed by book/DVD sales and signings.

Tuesday, May 13
Evolution of an Adventurer, Jonathan Waterman

7-8:30 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
A daring explorer and author of 12 books, including his latest, “Northern Exposures: An Adventuring Career in Stories and Images,” Waterman shares his career as a journalist and filmmaker through 35 years of dramatic images, videos and storytelling. 

Wednesday, May 14
Running Dry: The Future of Rivers, Jonathan Waterman
12-2 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
Light lunch provided by the Friends of the Library
What does the fate of the Colorado signify for the future of American rivers? The Colorado River irrigates 3.5 million acres of farmland and supports 30 million people throughout the West. This means the river runs dry before reaching the sea, devastating one of the greatest desert estuaries. Waterman retraces his journey, paddling 1,450 miles down the Colorado from source to sea to bring attention to one of the most diverted, litigated, and loved rivers in North America.
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Wednesday, May 14
To Conserve Unimpaired: Evolution of the National Park Idea, Robert B. Keiter
7-8:30 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
Each year, about 280 million people visit national parks, seeking jaw-dropping beauty and breathtaking excitement. The park system is charged with conserving these places unimpaired for future generations to enjoy. But what does this mean for today’s parks, which are not, and have never been, isolated nature reserves?  Keiter explores what the future may hold for parks in a world being reshaped by climate change and a pervasive human presence.

Thursday, May 15
Nature Conservation & Law: Lessons from Yellowstone & Beyond, Robert B. Keiter
12-1:30 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
Light lunch provided by the Friends of the Library
During the past 50 years, nature conservation has assumed an increasingly larger role on the western landscape. Changes in law and policy help account for this transformation, which includes new protective designations as well as ecologically-driven planning and management initiatives on public lands. This workshop examines the forces and changes afoot – climate change, demand for energy, development pressures – with a particular emphasis on the role of law in preserving sensitive landscapes.

Thursday, May 15
Wild Wilderness Exhibit Opening Reception, Carl Oksanen
6-7 pm
Get off the beaten path with stunning landscape photographs by cowboy turned cameraman, Carl Oksanen.

Short Films: Adventure Storytelling through the Lens, Arden Oksanen
7-8:30 pm
Filmmaker and Jackson native, Arden Oksanen, screens three short films: Brad Ludden Kayaking - Dong Khong, Laos; Castel: India & Kashmir; and Pictures of a Cowboy. Oksanen’s films takes viewers to Gulmarg, a destination not to be missed by world travelers before Pakistan and India started their nuclear standoff; to the Mekong River for extreme kayaking and on a walk through Wyoming’s wilderness with his father, Carl, a cowboy turned mountaineer and camerman. After the films, Carl and Arden take questions on adventure storytelling through the lens.

Friday, May 16
Workshop: Writing Naturally, Down-to-Earth Tips for Writing Personal-Narrative Nonfiction, Tim Cahill
10 am – 12 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
Cahill shares his step-by-step writing process, including: how to take notes, how to get those all important first words written, and how to structure an article. Yet Cahill warns: “There is always a caveat. Others may do this entirely differently. This is my process.”

Friday, May 16
Samaritans in the Death Zone, Nick Heil
7-8:30 pm
Location: Pink Garter Theatre
During Everest’s spring climbing season in 2006, a lone British climber named David Sharp was discovered incapacitated and near death close to the summit where nearly 40 climbers passed by him. Almost a week later, another climber, Australian Lincoln Hall, was discovered in similar straits. Why did one man live and the other die? Why did this incident spark so much public outrage and headlines around the world? Is it true that, as some climbers say, “There is no morality above 8,000 meters?” Heil discusses these and other ideas featured in his book, Dark Summit: The True Story of Everest’s Most Controversial Season.

Saturday, May 17
Workshop: Typing the Void, Notes on Craft for Non-Fiction Adventure Storytellers, Nick Heil
10 am-12 pm
Library Ordway Auditorium
This intensive workshop introduces participants to the primary components of long-form adventure storytelling. How long should a story be? How should I structure it? Examine recent examples of top-notch nonfiction to see what makes them so compelling. Participants also try their hand at a few writing exercises. This workshop arms participants with insights and skills so they may go forth and create or refine their own stories.

Saturday, May 17
No Gratuitous Chest Pounding: The Evolution of Outdoor Adventure Writing, Tim Cahill
7-8:30 pm
Location: Pink Garter Theatre
The original concept for Outside Magazine was simple: literate writing about the outdoors (which wasn’t being done in magazines back in 1977). Cahill shares his experiences founding Outside, editing Best American Travel Writing, and writing his books. He also explains what elements make or break outdoor writing – such as “phony epiphanies.” According to Cahill, “The way one approaches a wilderness story is to fashion a quest – find something that you are truly interested in finding or discovering.”