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TEEN REVIEWS - GoodReads.com

Teton County Library39members - Join Our Group
This is a group for library patrons and staff to review books they've read and share what they are currently reading.


Teen Non-Fiction Reviews: (View All)

  • We All Fall Down: Living with Addiction
  • Author: Nic Sheff
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: YA Bio Sheff N

    Dimmie Zeigler 4 stars
    This is a continuation of the story of Nic Sheff that was started with his father's book, My Beautiful Boy. Nic has had a life-long struggle with drug addiction and these books are hard to read. The fact the he has survived and is truly on the road to recovery is inspiring and gives hopes to the millions of those who share addictions.
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  • Guys Write for Guys Read
  • Author: Jon Scieszka
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TCL Call #: YA 810.8 Guys

    D-4.8 stars
    Wow. Pretty much every great male author in young adult and children's literature writing directly to boys, about what it's like to be a boy. I'm not a boy and I loved it. Some of the short stories are about these authors' personal experiences as boys or young men. They are real and touching and funny. I'm talking funny. Like stories about crushing on the high-school math teacher, being horrible at sports, getting called a girl. Mostly stories about humiliation, but they're honest and REAL (mostly).

    If you are a boy, you need to check out this book.
    If you don't really love reading, you need to check out this book.
    If you breathe air, you need to check out this book.
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Teen Fiction Reviews:(View All)

  • The Book Thief
  • Author: Markus Zusak
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TCL call number: YA Zusak M
    Stephanie’s rating: 5 stars

    Munich 1940’s. Suburb: Molching. Himmel Street has just confirmed a new arrival, that of 9 year old Liesel Meminger. Her foster parents, Hans and Rosa Hubermann, take her in and a beautiful story begins to unfold. The first of many is Hans teaching Liesel to read, Rudy (her best friend) and their devious adventures, Mrs. Hermann (the mayor’s wife) and her boundless library, and finally the arrival of Max Vandenburg, a Jew on the run. The relationships that Liesel and her counterparts create have a lasting effect on our narrator, Death. He sees the importance of these bonds and helps us, the readers; find those special connections in our own personal relationships. I have to say that despite the harshness of war, I found kindness and a heaping ton of love from this story. It’s beautifully written and I have a feeling that it will leave your heart aching, but in a good way!!


    Teton Co Library Call No: YA Zusak
    Marisa's Rating: 4 stars

    This was a genuinely beautifully written book. As the book summary says "It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . ." plus, there is some fantastic use of words. The Revolutionary Book club at the library chose this book and in the discussion we decided that this is a book of the importance of words. Liesel starts to see the word as critical when she learns to read, write her own book and understand how words can be manipulated to control people (like the Nazis of the German people). I really liked the perspective that Zusak provided using death as the narrator - a foreshadowing and almost cynical character. Death puts the disgusting atrocities of life on the shoulders of humans, a scary but great lesson. I would recommend this for teens but also for adults - great writing for all ages.
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  • The Hunchback Assignments (The Hunchback Assignments, #1)
  • Author: Arthur Slade
  • User Rating: 5
  • Review: TLC CALL #: YA SLADE A

    Chris’s Rating: 4.5 Stars
    Modo, a strong, but hideously deformed shape-shifting hunchback, is “rescued” (bought), by Mr. Socrates as an infant and trained to be a special agent for an organization so secret the British government scarcely knows it exists. Modo yearns to escape the confines of the building he has spent most of his life hidden within, but when the opportunity forces itself upon him, things are not exactly what he expects. On the streets without any friends, Modo supports himself by solving other people’s mysteries, and is drawn into a mystery involving disappearing children, and an evil clockwork guild which would cause terror to the nations of the world.
    The best way I can think of explaining the Hunchback Assignments would be to take The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Dr. Jeckle and Mr. Hyde, Shelly’s Frankenstein, Victorian Steampunk, Mystery/Agents, Shape-shifting and blend it all into one exciting Young Adult story. I expected to like the book and was not hugely disappointed. The characters, while not maintaining extensive depth or complexity, are diverse. Modo is extremely loyal to Mr. Socrates despite the fact that the older man is largely insensitive towards him and puts him into trying or difficult situations (Modo really knows little else and is somewhat naïve and childlike); but he is even more loyal to himself, when it comes to doing what he feels is right. The one thing I didn’t quite get was the Clockwork Guild’s end move, which likely inspired terror (or should have) but didn’t seem to do as much damage as I would have expected from such a sinister group…or maybe they are simply subtler than most villainous groups and I failed to put together all of the implications.
    Likely to appeal to teen readers who like mystery, suspense and a good dose of classic steampunk.
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