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TEEN REVIEWS - GoodReads.com

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This is a group for library patrons and staff to review books they've read and share what they are currently reading.


Teen Non-Fiction Reviews: (View All)

  • We All Fall Down: Living with Addiction
  • Author: Nic Sheff
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: YA Bio Sheff N

    Dimmie Zeigler 4 stars
    This is a continuation of the story of Nic Sheff that was started with his father's book, My Beautiful Boy. Nic has had a life-long struggle with drug addiction and these books are hard to read. The fact the he has survived and is truly on the road to recovery is inspiring and gives hopes to the millions of those who share addictions.
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  • Guys Write for Guys Read
  • Author: Jon Scieszka
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TCL Call #: YA 810.8 Guys

    D-4.8 stars
    Wow. Pretty much every great male author in young adult and children's literature writing directly to boys, about what it's like to be a boy. I'm not a boy and I loved it. Some of the short stories are about these authors' personal experiences as boys or young men. They are real and touching and funny. I'm talking funny. Like stories about crushing on the high-school math teacher, being horrible at sports, getting called a girl. Mostly stories about humiliation, but they're honest and REAL (mostly).

    If you are a boy, you need to check out this book.
    If you don't really love reading, you need to check out this book.
    If you breathe air, you need to check out this book.
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Teen Fiction Reviews:(View All)

  • The Thief (The Queen's Thief, #1)
  • Author: Megan Whalen Turner
  • User Rating: 3
  • Review: TCL Call#: YA Turner

    Chris’s Rating: 3.5 Stars
    Gen, a master thief, has been rotting in the King’s prison for having the audacity to steal the king’s seal on a bet, then flaunt it in a local tavern. But it is possible that his prison days are over, if he can accept the king’s right hand man as his master and steal an item that will ensure the joining of two kingdoms. The item is something of a mystery, connected to gods and legend; but it has not been seen for generations…if it ever existed at all. Traveling through enemy lands, fighting along the way, Gen learns to respect the king’s man, even though he is far from perfect and cocky Gen will never be anyone’s servant.
    I originally picked up The Thief because of a review of The False Prince, which claimed that author had merely copied Turner just changing the names…and it turned out there were striking similarities between the two novels. The story background was different, although the medieval/renaissance time frame could have been very close; the three boys were very alike, as was the master (although the master in The False Prince was eviler and the conflict between the boys was greater with more suspense, perhaps why I liked Nielsen’s book better); both books involved “king-making” or a struggle for power. All in all, the correlations are very strong, which led me to not know whether the Thief was a predictable book, or I could just guess because I read the False Prince. But for some pros and cons:
    Pros: 1. An entertaining story with a satisfying conclusion, characters with different motivations, some almost cruel, although not always maliciously meant; 2. a book that is complete in its story, but leaves plenty to go on for other novels.
    Cons: 1. Gen was rather annoying and lazy at first, nor did he seem like a thief (given that he liked bright colors, was loud about what he was going to do, and a couple of his actions); 2. Gen sometimes mentions how effective or “thought out” a response is before the actual dialog comes up, which was slightly annoying; 3. the start and actual traveling, while probably realistic, seemed less eventful and to rehash some of the same problems over a few times…it gets better half way through.
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  • The Dark Lord of Derkholm
  • Author: Diana Wynne Jones
  • User Rating: 3
  • Review: TLC Call #: YA JONES

    Chris's Rating: 3 Stars
    The setting: a magical world semi-ruled by a wealthy, almost characterless businessman from Earth who holds a demon in his pocket. The problem: If the world doesn’t put on a number of yearly “fantasy shows-trips” for the inhabitants of earth (some of whom are “expendable”) the businessman lets out the said demon to destroy the magical world. The plan: sabotage the “Pilgrim Parties” to make them so unpleasant and unprofitable that the evil Mr. Chesnesy will leave and never come back…at least that is the plan for some.
    Each year a new wizard is asked to play the Dark Lord for the “Pilgrim Parties” where visitors from earth come to watch and battle their way through an extravagant fantasy adventure…for a cost of course, which lines the pockets of Mr. Cheseney, not those doing any of the work. A certain set of circumstances set up the unconventional Derk (who has both human and griffin children) as the next Dark Lord. Even as he is being sabotaged, Dirk bumbles his way through the parties until events happen which lead him to simply not care.
    This book didn’t really live up to my expectations…perhaps because it wasn’t the kind of humor I was expecting. The setting is complex enough and there were parts where I really got into it, but there were parts where I was equally turned off. By the end I also found it odd that a foreigner could control a world with a single demon, when at least one of the dragons seemed more than a match for any demon. Lots of characters and an unusual fantasy world that isn’t nearly as exciting in an action sort of way as the ones in “books,” except for when the “Pilgrim Parties” roll around.
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