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TEEN REVIEWS - GoodReads.com

Teton County Library39members - Join Our Group
This is a group for library patrons and staff to review books they've read and share what they are currently reading.


Teen Non-Fiction Reviews: (View All)

  • We All Fall Down: Living with Addiction
  • Author: Nic Sheff
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: YA Bio Sheff N

    Dimmie Zeigler 4 stars
    This is a continuation of the story of Nic Sheff that was started with his father's book, My Beautiful Boy. Nic has had a life-long struggle with drug addiction and these books are hard to read. The fact the he has survived and is truly on the road to recovery is inspiring and gives hopes to the millions of those who share addictions.
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  • Guys Write for Guys Read
  • Author: Jon Scieszka
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TCL Call #: YA 810.8 Guys

    D-4.8 stars
    Wow. Pretty much every great male author in young adult and children's literature writing directly to boys, about what it's like to be a boy. I'm not a boy and I loved it. Some of the short stories are about these authors' personal experiences as boys or young men. They are real and touching and funny. I'm talking funny. Like stories about crushing on the high-school math teacher, being horrible at sports, getting called a girl. Mostly stories about humiliation, but they're honest and REAL (mostly).

    If you are a boy, you need to check out this book.
    If you don't really love reading, you need to check out this book.
    If you breathe air, you need to check out this book.
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Teen Fiction Reviews:(View All)

  • Dodger
  • Author: Terry Pratchett
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TLC CALL #: YA PLAYAWAY PRATCHETT T

    Chris’s Rating: 3.75 Stars
    A girl is being mistreated by two men in the dark when they are set upon by seventeen year-old Dodger, a tosher (enters the sewers looking for valuables) of some note. Shortly after the two are found my Charlie Dickens and a friend who convince the young tramp to let them take the girl and get her help. This is the beginning of Dodger’s transformation into a new life, where he will become…he’s not exactly sure…it’s a fog…but something new. Dodger’s initial act of heroism (saving the girl) is followed by other events (including defeating the notorious Sweeney Todd), but while the public venerate what he is doing, the boy knows his heroics are not as glorious as the public believes, hence, they are a fog, something where the real details are jumbled and not always very clear. This is a new concept for Dodger—one that just might save him when an acclaimed assassin comes to call.
    I enjoyed Dodger, although I didn’t detect Pratchett’s humor until later on in the book, and perhaps it was less so than other works. The story had a light, meandering manner which was never really very suspenseful, despite some of the occurrences. Charlie Dickens (and other historical figures) were a treat…including the deranged but not entirely evil Sweeney Todd, suffering from PTSD. Dodger’s friend Solomon added greatly to the story, as did the “fog,” the concept where people make something of what they see, whether or not it is the whole truth. The romance in the book is rather contrived, but plays an important part in the conclusion. Overall an enjoyable read good for teens who like interesting stories that meander into past London set around real characters in a setting that might have been semi-real for those living there.
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  • The Demon King (Seven Realms, #1)
  • Author: Cinda Williams Chima
  • User Rating: 3
  • Review: TLC Call #: YA PLAYAWAY CHIMA C

    Chris’s Rating: 3.5 Stars
    Impoverished Han, a previous street lord with connections to the clans, is hunting with a friend when they encounter three young wizards who are setting fire to the hillside in order to drive a herd of deer to a royal hunting party. In a brief conflict of magic verses steel and bows, Micah (the chief of the young wizards) is forced to drop a powerful amulet which Han carefully collects. Conversely, Princess Raisa, whom Micah was trying to impress, begins seeing visions of wolves (a sign that danger is approaching the royal bloodline). Han struggles to support his poor family and avoid his previous gang life and Raisa seeks freedom and the ability to make her own choices despite intrigues and her mother’s persistent coaching. The fate of both are slightly intertwined as they try to take control of their destinies, even if destiny itself won’t let them.
    The Demon King had its ups and downs, like many books. The world building is fantastic and seems real. The conflict, part predictable, part not, was well played. Still I found myself almost giving up on it for the following reasons: 1. Raisa annoyed me to no end at first. She was a spoiled brat princess that pushed her real friends into corners because she couldn’t have her way with anyone else. Her obsession with the “forbidden” (something the author claimed Han also had sometime further in) got somewhat annoying eventually; but what bugged me the most was everyone’s obsession with kissing and making out…with as many different people as possible. It got to the point that every time I heard the word kiss (I was listening not reading) I started to cringe. Really it was the world and the plot that pulled me through and is making me consider continuing the story, more so than the characters…although twist in Han’s fate at the end (albeit predictable) is also a lure. Another point in the story’s favor is, that as a Young Adult book, the story doesn’t lack for young characters. This story is likely to appeal to youth who like world building, fantasy with boundaries that makes it seem real, and a measure of romance/failed romance/conflict. Suggested for readers 14+
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